Johnson City, New York
We can show you how to turn your yard into a birdfeeding habitat that brings song, color and life to your home.

Seed & Suet Sale

We have a variety of the best seed blends and suet in town! Our seed blends:

  • are chosen by your local expert
  • are formulated to care for your birds.
  • contain no cereal fillers – just seeds your birds love.

Our suet and no-melt suet dough contain high-quality ingredients and make every trip to the feeder count.

SAVE NOW on Bird Seed & Suet Cakes (Now thru 10/27/16)*

*Valid only at the participating store(s) listed. One discount per purchase. Not valid with other discounts or previous purchases. Offer expires 10/27/16.


Providing Food Now Will Help Later

During fall and winter, chickadees, nuthatches and titmice will hide food to retrieve and eat at a later time. This behavior is called "caching." Caching helps birds survive during bad weather and when food sources are low.

These birds store hundreds of seeds a day, and each seed is placed in a different location and they remember where each one is. They can find each site accurately even a month later.

By providing an easily accessible food source, you can help your chickadees, nuthatches and titmice with their caching needs. Below is a little more detail on some of your favorite birds' caching behaviors.

Chestnut-backed Chickadee


  • Cache seeds (in the shell and out), nuts, insects and other invertebrate prey
  • Food is typically cached about 100 feet (30 m) from feeders
  • Cache more during the middle of the day
  • May carry off several seeds at a time, but each item is stored in a separate location
  • Store food in knotholes, bark, under shingles, in the ground and on the underside of small branches

Red-breasted Nuthatch


  • Prefer to cache hulled sunflower seeds, because they are easier and faster to cache; occasionally mealworms
  • Choose heavier seeds (because they are larger or have a higher oil content)
  • Food is typically cached about 45 feet (13.5 m) from feeders
  • Most active caching time is early in the day
  • Store food in bark crevices on large tree trunks and on the underside of branches

Tufted Titmouse


  • Cache sunflower, peanuts and safflower
  • Food is typically cached about 130 feet (40 m) from feeders
  • Cache one seed at a time and typically choose the largest seeds available
  • Often remove seeds from their shell (80% of the time) before hiding them